Causerie de John Montague

Michèle DUCLOS  Avec l`assistance de Josine MONBET  et de Michael SCOTT  (Université de Bordeaux Ill)  Depuis plusieurs étés constitutifs, ]ohn Montagne et sa famille passent  leurs vacances dans le village de Mauriac au nord de la région bordelaise. A  plusieurs reprises, le poète a été l`hôte de l’Université de Bordeaux lll et a  reçu un accueil chaleureux des étudiants et des enseignants. Nous proposons  ici la transcription d’une de ses lectures-causeries suivie de questions et d`une  conversation à bâtons rompus ; elle eut lieu en mars 1987.

JM: The first thing to say is that the lrish poet, the lrish Writer, is writing in a language which is not the language of his country. In the 1850s there were three famines. In 1840 the population of Ireland was eight  million. By 1850 it had been almost halved. Some had died in the three famines, and a good many had gone into exile, in America, in Canada…  Sometimes they died when they arrived. So the whole country had  changed. But what was clear was that the people who stayed, especially the young people, would have to learn English. We were inside an English-speaking world. So we have got after the great famine the great silence – the silence that fell upon Ireland as it tried to relearn its conquerors’ tongue. We’ve learnt this conquerors’ tongue with a special method : at school a tally stick was placed around your neck,  and every time you used a word of the old language you had a nick on  the stick. In the end you got (il tape sur la table avec le plat de la main) as many as there were on the stick. So the children leamt English. They  learnt the language of Queen Victoria. Not the most rich English that was ever invented. Now this is to me essential to the Irish experience in literature. It is a language that they had to learn. lt was our  conquerors’ language. It is a language that we will conquer. On va les avoir dans leur langue. C’est peut-être notre seule victoire : Monsieur  Joyce, Monsieur Yeats et les autres. Hein ? Voilà… (lit)       

A GRAFTED TONGUE

(Dumb,

Bloodied, the severed

head now chokes to

speak another tongue –

As in

a long suppressed dream,

some stuttering, garb-

led ordeal of my own)

An Irish

child weeps at school

repeating its English.

After each mistake

The master

gouges another mark

on the tally stick

hung about its neck

Like a bell

on a cow, a hobble

on a straying goat.

To slur and stumble

In shame

the altered syllables

of your own name ;

to stray sadly home

And find

the turf cured with

of your parents’ hearth

growing alien :

In cabin

and field, they still

speak the old tongue.

You may greet no one.

To grow

a second tongue, as

harsh a humiliation

as twice to be born.

Decades later,

that child’s grandchild’s

speech stumbles over lost

syllables of an old order.

  l was brought up in the Clogher Valley, in the North of lreland, in a  country post-office. And the people used to come down to collect their pensions and the small boy that l was waited for them to get a bit of their  pensions (rires). And also there was a passage grave that stood at the birth of our civilization. Anyone who has been to Brittany has seen those great stones. We also have them with lovely designs on them. There were at least two nearly by. And we had one on our land. I was fascinated by their curlicues, these strange signs – « l’art celtique”, on l’appelle, mais c’est longtemps avant  l’”art celtique”. So l joined these dolmens, those stones, ces pierres, with my  own childhood, and with all this association of old people, in a very rhythmic  poem. l think l was thinking of Mr Yeats. I knew more about the Irish countryside than he did, whatever about our “standings”…     

LiKE DOLMENS ROUND MY CHILDHOOD,

                              THE OLD PEOPLE

Like dolmens round my childhood, the old people.

Jamie MacCrystal sang to himself,

A broken song without tune, without words ;

He tipped me a penny every pension day,

Fed kindly crusts to winter birds.

When he died, his cottage was robbed,

Mattress and money box torn and searched.

Only the corpse they didn’t disturb.

Maggie Owens was surrounded by animals,

A mongrel bitch and shivering pups,

Even in her bedroom a she-goat cried.

She was a well of gossip defiled,

Fanged chronicler of a whole countryside :

Reputed a witch, all l could find

Was her lonely need to deride.

The Nialls lived along a mountain lane

Where heather bells bloomed, clumps of foxglove.

All were blind, With Blind Pension and Wireless,

Dead eyes serpent-flicked as one entered

To shelter from a downpour of mountain rain.

Crickets chirped under the rocking hearthstone

Until the muddy sun shone out again.

Mary Moore lived in a crumbling gatehouse,

Famous as Pisa for its leaning gable.

Bag-apron and boots, she tramped the fields

Driving lean cattle from a miry stable.

A by-word for fierceness, she fell asleep

Over love stories, Red Stat and Red Circle,

Dreamed of gypsy love rites, by firelight sealed.

Wild Billy Eagleson married a Catholic servant girl

When all his Loyal family passed on :

We danced round him shoutíng ‘To Hell with King Billy`,

And dodged from the arc of his flailing blackthorn.

Forsaken by both creeds, he showed little concern

Until the Orange drums banged past in the summer

And bowler and sash aggressively shone.

Curate and doctor trudged to attend them,

Through knee-deep snow, through summer heat,

From main road to lane to broken path,

Gulping the mountain air with painful breath.

Sometimes they were found by neighbours,

Silent keepers of a smokeless hearth,

Suddenly cast in the mould of death.

Ancient Ireland, indeed! I was reared by her bedside,

The rune and the chant, evil eye and averted head,

Fomorian fierceness of family and local feud.

Gaunt figures of fear and of friendliness,

For years they trespassed on my dreams,

Until once, in a standing circle of stones,

I felt their shadows pass

Into that dark permanence of ancient forms.

Now a love poem, a more metaphysical poem, not a poem of << pierres  ancestrales ›> but a poem about the more intimate problems of life which I  have spent a long time trying to explain in my poetry – so long that I cannot  possibly enter into the subject now :

UPROOTING

My love, while we talked

They removed the roof. Then

They started on the walls,

Panes of glass uprooting

From timber, like teeth.

But you spoke calmly on,

Your example of courtesy

Compelling me to reply.

When we reached the last

Syllable, nearly accepting

Our positions, I saw that

The floorboards were gone :

lt was clay we stood upon.

I’ll now read a poem which is in a sense a kind of love poem called “The Trout”. As a boy l was not accustomed to something as << classy ›> as a fishing-

rod. l used to tickle trout —  in some way this is a very sensuous action. In a way a kind of preparation for other forms of tickling… So in a sense it is a love poem : it’s about having to touch some other body, with great delicacy.  So this poem is called “The Trout”: and as befits it is a very watery poem :

THE TROUT

Flat on the bank I parted

Rushes to ease my hands

ln the water without a ripple

And tilt them slowly downstream

T0 where he lay, tendril light,

In his fluid sensual dream.

Bodiless lord of creation

I hung briefly above him

Savouring my own absence

Senses expanding in the slow

Motion, the photographic calm

That grows before action.

As the curve of my hands

Swung under his body

He surged, with visible pleasure.

l was so preternaturally close

l could count every stipple

But still cast no shadow, until

The two palms crossed in a cage

Under the lightly pulsíng gills.

Then (entering my own enlarged

Shape, which rode on the water)

l gripped. To this day I can

Taste his terror on my hands.

We live in a very, very changing age, and somebody who comes through the North of lreland quite often is astonished by the rate of change. I remember once travelling down from Belfast on a bus –  tranquillement –  I came and had changed buses in Dungannon which is a town l know. I had thought l would go off to see a friend of mine Who owns a public-house – a pub. l went down to see the pub – the pub was gone. And then I came back to catch my bus – and the bus was on fire (rires). So my view of all these things has become almost a kind of surrealism. Somebody that you are talking to might suddenly disappear – phuitt… lt’s not all the lRA… they have got modern methods, they’ve got  technology ; they can transform you  into a plastic bag… So as l think about these things and as l deal with  them – after all there were two people killed in the Champs Elysées  yesterday… This is not just an Irish problem, not just an Ulster problem…  it is now easy to reduce people to nothing. So I made a poem, which l called  “ Ratonnade, The Dance of the Rats”. lt is about the end of all civilization. This is what possibly we face, our << lovely ›> civilization to be dismantled :

RATONNADE

Godoi, godoi, godoi!

Our city burns & so did Troy,

Finic, Finic, marshbirds cry

As bricks assemble a new toy.

Godoi, godoi, godoi.

Humble mousewives crouch in caves,

Monster rats lash their tails,

Cheese grows scarce in Kingdom Come,

Rodents leap to sound of drum.

Godoi, etc.

Civilisation slips & slides when

Death sails past with ballroom glide :

Tangomaster of the skulls whose

Harvest lies in griefs & rues.

Godoi, etc.

On small hillsides darkens fire,

Wheel goes up, forgetting tyre,

Grudgery holds its winter court,

Smash and smithereens to report.

Godoi, etc.

Against such horrors hold a cry,

Sweetness mothers us to die,

Wisens digs its garden patch,

Silence lifts a silver latch.

Godoi, etc.

Mingle musk love-birds say,

Honey-hiving all the day,

Ears & lips & private parts,

Muffled as the sound of carts.

Godoi, etc.

Moral is of worsens hours,

Cripple twisting only flowers,

One arm lost, one leg found,

Sad men fall on common ground.

Godoi!

We’ll end on a quieter note. l’m beginning to look at the world from  a higher level. Not necessarily mystic – l don’t like to use the word mystic.  One shouldn’t call oneself a mystic. Well now look at two poems, one called “ Mount Eagle”.  –

  Question : Are you the Eagle ?      : Am l the Eagle (rit) ? And Yeats “the Tower”…       

MOUNT EAGLE

I

The eagle looked at this changing world ;

sighed and disappeared into the mountain.

Before he left he had a last reconnoitre :

the multi-coloured boats in the harbour

Noddecl their masts, and a sandy white

crescent of strand smiled back at him.

How he liked the slight, drunk lurch

of the fishing fleet, the ride hoist-

ing them a little, at their ropes’ end.

Beyond, wrack, and the jutting rocks

emerging, slowly, monsters stained

and slimed with strands of seaweed.

Ashore, beached boats and lobster

  pots, settled as hens in the sand.

ll

Content was life in its easiest form ;

another was the sudden, growling storm

which the brooding eagle preferred

bending his huge wings into the winds

wild buffeting, or thrusting down along

the wide sky, at an angle, slideways to

survey the boats, scurrying homewards,

tacking against the now contrary winds,

all of whom he knew by their names.

To be angry in the morning, calmed

by midday, but brooding again in

the evening was all in a day’s quirk

with lengthy intervals for silence,

gliding along, like a blessing, while

the fleet toiled on earnestly beneath

him, bulging with a fine day’s catch.

III

But now he had to enter the mountain.

Why? Because a cliff had asked him?

The whole world was changing, with one

language dying, and another encroaching,

bright with buckets, cries of children.

There seemed to be no end to them,

and the region needed a guardian —

so the mountain had told him. And

A different destiny lay before him :

to be the spirit of that mountain.

Everyone would stand in awe of him.

When he was wrapped in the mist`s caul

they would withdraw because of him,

peer from behind blind, or curtain.

\When he lifted his wide forehead

bold with light, in the morning,

they would all laugh and smile with him.

lt was a greater task than an eagle`s

aloofness, but sometimes, under his oilskin

of coiled mist, he sighed for lost freedom.

One last poem, “The Well Dreams”, which is also part of my new work.  If one has the mountain, standing up there, one also has the water. Water and stones are two great verities, two great, lasting truths. There is a great deal of water running through my work : you heard “The Trout”. At the centre of the Rough Field you climb up to the source of a river. And at a crucial point in The Dead Kingdom you have” The Well Dreams” which urges you to a kind  of a silence. Let’s concentrate on the well, and see what the well teaches us :

THE WELL DREAMS

The Well dreams ;

liquid bubbles.

Or it stirs

as a water spider skitters across ;

a skinny legged dancer.

Sometimes, a gross interruption :

a stone plumps in.

That takes a while to absorb,

to digest, much groaning

and commotion in the well’s stomach

before it can proffer again

a nearly sleek surface.

Even a pebble disturbs

that tremor laden meniscus,

that implicit shivering.

They sink towards the floor,

the basement of quiet,

settle into a small mosaic.

And the single eye

of the well dreams on,

a silent cyclops.

ll

People are different.

They live outside, insist

in their world of agitation.

A man comes by himself,

singing or in silence,

and hauls up his bucket slowly –

an act of meditation –

or jerks it up angrily

like lifting a sliver of skin,

sweeping a circle

right through his own reflection.

Ill

And the well recomposes itself.

Crowds arrive, annually, on pilgrimage.

Votive offerings adorn the bushes ;

a child’s rattle, hanging silent

(except when the wind touches it)

a tag fluttering like a pennant.

Or a tarnished coin is thrown in,

sinking soundlessly to the bottom.

Waters alchemy washes it clean :

a queen of the realm, made virgin again.

lV

Birds chatter above it.

They are the well’s principal distraction,

swaying at the end of branches,

singing and swaying, darting excitement

of counting and nesting,

fending for the next brood,

Who yet seem the same robin,

thrush, blackbird or wren.

The trees stay stoically silent.

The storms speak through them.

Then the leaves come sailing down,

Sharp green or yellow,

betraying the seasons,

till a flashing shield of ice

forms of the well’s single eye :

the years final gift,

a static transparence.

v

But a well has its secret.

Under the drifting leaves,

the dormant stones in

the whitewashed wall,

the unpredictable ballet

of waterbugs, insects,

There the spring pulses,

little more than a tremor,

a flickering quiver,

spasms of silence ;

small intensities of mirth,

the hidden laughter of earth.

                                                                                                                                                          ***************

Maintenant, les questions…

Question : Vous êtes actuellement professeur à l’Université de Cork, dans  le sud de l’lrlande, mais vous vous dites très concerné par ce qui se passe en  Ulster, la terre de vos ancêtres, et aussi par ce qui arrive dans le monde  entier…    :

JM : I always try to understand what is happening in the world, yes I do.  I read The Herald Tribune every day. I am not easy if l don’t understand what is happening in… let’s say in the Middle East even. We are all implicated in this world drama ; we are now members of a global village. And through television we have this global village – television of course is both a curse and a blessing. The blessing is that you can try to understand more people and understand more how they work. So I keep my eye, my eagle eye, on certain facts of the world. Trying to understand it, trying to divine what happens, what might happen. Therefore l think that anything l write does have a sense of that spirit in it. For instance if I write about Belfast I am always thinking of Beyrouth, I am not just thinking of Belfast. lreland is a  third-world country, an extremely poor, << potato >> Republic which shows all the signs of post-colonial trauma. We are a poor, third-world country which has lost its language, placed between two highly industrialised countries, and still keep blathering on…

Question : When you say << we >>, do you mean Ulster, Eire or the whole  island ?

J.M. : Oh I mean the whole island ; this kind of nationalism is definitely  a nineteenth century notion. Ireland should have become a nation round about by 1880 with Gladstone’s Home Rule bills and maybe even have joined with England. l don’t give a damn about that. But nationalism was not allowed to work: and we had the reactions of the Ulster protestants to the Home Rule bills ; and we still have this reaction one hundred years later. And now with the Anglo-Irish agreement which is meant to catch them out, to expose Ulster protestants for what they are … It seems the only operation which can be done – to expose them. I think of the Ulster Protestants, of the extreme Ulster Protestants, l also think about the American South. Protestant Paisley had his degree from Bob Jones University in South  Carolina. l also think of the Brudderkind in South America. I do think South Africa is the last ditch where they hold up and they always think their neighbours are inferior. And there are the Ulster protestants basically the   extreme Ulster protestants. According to what is called the Westminster Confession, they do believe that the Church of Rome is the Scarlet Whore, and that the Pope is anti-Christ. That’s why they can’t associate With us. it’s a very strong, very old fashioned belief. I don’t know whether john Paul the  Second is anti-Christ (Rit), lt certainly makes him sound more glamorous  (rires). But if you have this primitive Protestantism, you have to understand it. So l always read the world news and travel the world ; trying to understand  all the better my own little area.

  Question : You’ve lived in France for a long time and lectured at Vincennes ;  your name points to a French origin ; your first and your second wives are  French. How do you feel about the country, particularly its Celtic fringe in Brittany, and about French poetry ?    :

JM :  Complicated question. i was born the same day as Michel de  Montaigne – same day, same signs  (dans la salle : not same  year – Rires). Well, I could be a reincarnation (Rires). I have always, for  some extraordinary reason, been quite at ease with the French. i like their  wit, l like their joie de vivre. I sometimes don’t like the way they play rugby (Rires, commentaires dans la salle : we’ve beaten you). No, no, you need not be rough. I find perhaps that France is my own opposite. It helps me to put my thoughts in order. Where there was chaos, I can bring some kind of semblance of shape. You ask about Brittany. It is true there is a profound connection between the old stones I was speaking of, and the stones in Brittany. Now you have got a very strange situation in France which is rarely explored, something that you may be afraid to explore. France has got a grafted tongue. French is as Robert Graves said rather cruelly, bad Latin which has been learned at the ‘whips of slave owners. It is not the oldest language in this country ; it is a form of Latin. And there was a language here before. And there was a civilization here before. But the French ignor it, they don’t want to know about it. And they don’t want to know about that ancient Celtic civilization which was up the Rhone valley. They don`t want to know about that. So, there is a grafted tongue here. The Breton civilization is of course based upon the exiles of Wales ; they were all Britons. l don’t feel as  much sympathy with them as I would have with – let’s say the Scots who speak a different form of Gaelic. So, really it’s quite complicated. l am curious  as to why the French have buried their Gaulish past and yet when they are  looking for a great national leader, they choose somebody callecl Charles de  Gaulle (Rires).    (Dans la salle : this is a Flemish name).    : Why, do you think he is a fraud too ? (Rires).

  When l began to read poetry l was very conscious of the great achievements of the French during the nineteenth century : Charles Baudelaire, Arthur  Rimbaud jules Laforgue Tristan Corbiere, Gerard de Nerval… This  is great poetry. And. even during the last war there were still poets who could reach an audience. Poetry became the voice of France during the last war with  the call to arms of people like Eluard, René Char even André Frenaucl… and there is a generation of great French poets including Pong but they are not  known in this country. They are not read very much. are they ? They are not, not even the young poets – the French poets of my generation delight in being unreadable – lls prennent plaisir à être illisibles. Des hommes très  intelligents, comme Michel Deguy, Andre du Bouchet. You don’t bring them  to bed with you to read (Rires). You don’t bring them to read to your loved ones. They don’t rise off your tongue naturally. And l is that sad. French  poetry en face de la société de consommation has lost its nerve…

  After the great generation of Baudelaire, Laforgue, , the French  poets took example on Mallarmé and Valery and became very  “hermétiques” – and so they don’t reach out to the audience. I get along with them,  yes, l have great friends among them, Michel Deguy, Robert Marteau, Claude  Esteban, but they are not translatable easily into English. None of the major French poets – Jouve, Char, Ponge, Bonnefoy Guillevic _- have been  translated into English in any serious way. The great exchange with France  took place With TS. Eliot and Ezra Pound, but they were interested mainly  in the French poets of the late nineteenth century. They had few exchanges with living French poets. TS.Eliot puhlished some Valery in The Criterion, but that is not to be regarded as a living contact. It’s only David Gascoyne  and myself who have tried to undergo the French experience. l enjoyed it,  but l was always aware it was almost a handicap. The English distrust the French mind, they do not wish to hear about poetry. They regard it as a very wrong kind of poetry. You yourself say you would need some lectures to understand French poets to-day – and they are the poets of your own country ! They should be able to be read as they are. They are trop  << herrnétiques ›>. Leur écriture est trop travaillée. C’est pas fait pour être lu.  Si vous prenez les grands poèmes de Ted Hughes, comme « The Pike » ou ses  poèmes sur les saumons, un poète français n’écrira jamais  Parce que c’est  folklorique. C’est pas << intello ›>.On ne peut pas le publier dans Tel Quel,  les revues de poésie… There has been a << rupture >>, a break between the  French poet and his audience. He would have it that it’s his audience who  is to blame, et que dans cette grande société de consommation, les gens ne  sont pas intéressés par les choses de l’esprit. Le poète français est  complètement isole. Il écrit pour les autres poètes, pour << les intellos ›>. lls  sont intimidés aussi par tous ces grands critiques, Lacan, Chomski, Roland  Barthes Jakobson. Alors un poème semble très petit, très court, à côté de ces  grands messieurs. Pourtant C’est God’s Gift pour le département d’Anglais,  Lacan, les sémiologistes, les structuralistes, tout ça… Parce que la plupart cles  universitaires ont peur de la poésie. lit could bite them (Rit). So when they  see a poem, they place it into a straight-jacket. On l’analyse. Un poème pour  l’universitaire, c’est pas un poème, c’est un texte. Et dans la Nouvelle Critique,  le lecteur est aussi important que le poète. Il est créatif aussi. C’est de la  connerie totale.

  NOTES  Les poèmes cités figurent dans Selected Poems, OUP, 1982, à l’exception de << Ratonnade ›> tiré  de A Slow Dance, Dolmen Press et OUP, 1975.

  Deux éditions bilingues de poèmes de John Montagne ont paru au printemps 1988 :    La langue Greffée, Paris, Belin, Préface de Jacques Darras, Poèmes traduits par J. Darras,  C. Esteban, S. Fauchereau.-P. Paye, C. Hubin, P. Rafroidi, C. Vespeyen-Maestrini.

  Amours, Marée; (The Tide of Love), Bordeaux, William Blake and Co, Préface de John  Montague, Traduction par le collectif du Groupe d`Etudes et de Recherche Britanniques de  l’Université de Bordeaux3  (J. Briat, M. Duclos,_J. Monbet, N. Ollier, A. Perez, M. Scott).  ×

Publié dans ÉTUDES IRLANDAISES, no XIV-2, Décembre 1989, 89-101.

Publicités

Interview de Harry Clifton

Michèle DUCLOS

(Université de Bordeaux III)

Au printemps 1996, le poète Harry Clifton (avec sa femme, la romancière Deidre Madden) a été l’invité, comme << poet in residence ››, du Centre régional des lettres d’Aquitaine et de l’université de Bordeaux III. Un choix de ses poèmes, traduit par le collectif de traduction littéraire du Groupes d’études et de recherche britannique (GERB) de cette même université, a donné lieu à une publication – bilingue – par les Presses universitaires de Bordeaux (1), sous le titre Le Canto d’Ulysse.

Harry Clifton a accepté de répondre aux questions suivantes :

Can yon give some information on yourself and your work ?

The principal point of information in relation to my work is that, althoug born and reared in Ireland and with a strong nationalistic background on my father”s side of the family, I have spent at least half my adult life elsewhere, perhaps because of South American ancestry and the need to complete a personality only part of wich is reflected in Irish society. So in my poems there is a constant bipolarity, between Ireland and elsewhere, North and South, id and consciousness etcetera, Which I have perhaps cultivated in preference to the more traditional “rootedness” usually associated With Irish poetry.

Do you write other types of work than poems ?

The extreme subjectivity of poetry means that, at a certain point in life, most poets _ and I am no exception – will Wish to stand outside themselves, to see themselves objectively, in the context of their times, so to speak. That is why I, like others, have turned temporarily to fiction, though always as a secondary mode. Again, the solitude of the poetic life needs to be diversified by the gregariousness of entering into contemporary debates, or debates with the Whole poetic tradition – hence criticism, which I also write. For a poet, though, both fiction and criticism are really a kind of ground-clearing, a clearing of space in which new poetiy may happen.

You do not seem intent on translating other poets, as Eliot did with Saint john Perse, or Derek Mahon from the French or Irish poets from the Gaelic. ..

To travel and change countries as much as I have means, in the end, to consider oneself a citizen of one`s own language rather than any particular place. Therefore, wherever I am, immersion in my own language is a way of protecting my identity. Immersion in other languages, through translating activity for instance, would threaten that identity.

The bilingual volume of your poems is entitled Le Canto d°Ulysse. This most likely alludes to your protracted stays in Africa, Asia, Europe, but probably also to Pound and joyce ?

The title of my bilingual volume The Canto d ‘Ulysse was chosen because it seemed to unite two principal strands in the poems collected in that book, namely love and travel, or the search for experience, which are Ulyssean motifs _- and also perhaps because the Ulysses theme, through Joyce, has a specially Irish resonance. The title poem of the volume is an attempt to celebrate the consequences, and to an extent the risks, of an “Ulyssean” life.

Have you been contemplating writing a long poem like Pound, Montague, William Carlos Williams or Kenneth White ?

The dynamics of a long poem are nearer to fiction than to lyric poetry. As a lyric poet, I prefer concentration to extension. If I wished to introduce elements of character, plot or psychology into a text, I would probably choose fiction rather than a long poem. A long poem today is usually an assemblage of lyric fragments anyway.

Your verse is both free and rhymed. You insist on the importance of form. Do you consider yourself experimental, traditional, romantic ?

Although I grew up in a culture where the formal poem was paramount, I was excited to discover at university the whole spectrum of twentieth-century American poetry, from the absolutely free to the classically formal, and made it my ideal to the able to move freely between the two, in the manner of, say, Elizabeth Bishop or Theodore Roethke, though always, I hope, maintaining the tension of the original experience.

The East has influenced contemporary Irish poetry, either in content or in form. What about you ?

Although I lived in the Far East for two years, and wrote a number of poems about The East, in no way could I say that Eastern elements, either of poetic technique or of spirituality, have influenced my work. I have remained, wherever I travelled, an essentially “Western” poet – for better or worse. My poem “Death of Thomas Merton” in the bilingual book most nearly exemplifies what I mean about being Western in an Eastern context.

Do you understand Gaelic and how do you stand concerning Irish culture ?

I grew up in a recently-independent Irish state which forcefed Gaelic to its schoolchildren in the (government-inspired) hope of consolidating national identity. For me and for many others, this led only to a resistance to the language and a distancing from Gaelic culture as a whole. On the other hand, Irish writers in English have been important to me at various times, notably Joyce and Kavanagh for their sense of place, and Beckett for his placelessness.

Who are the poets (Irish, English, French…) you willingly acknowledge a debt to ?

There are two types of indebtedness in poetry, technique and vision. When I was first trying to write poems (made objects) rather than poetry (subjective adolescent gush), the work of Thomas Kinsella helped me toward a right relation between word and object, a simplicity I could build upon ever afterwards. At the same time the celebratory vision of poets as different as Patrick Kavanagh and René Char is something I have worked towards all my life, with far greater difficulty.

Both Ted Hughes and Kenneth White consider the poet to-day should assume a shamanic function in his society. How do you stand by this form of commitment ?

I don”t believe that poets, either as shamans or otherwise, have a “function in societyl. They do, however, stand between what is social and what is non-social, pointing to the latter, and in this sense they are shamans, if by shaman is meant an intermediary between the human and the non-human. In this sense Ted Hughes and Kenneth White, pointing as they do to animal or geophysical forces beyond human society, are shamans. But poets, like shamans, are only intermediaries, never leaders. As soon as leadership enters the picture, you have corruption.

Etudes urlandaises – Printemps 1998 n°23-1

Entretien avec Shizue Ogawa – février 2010

    M. D. │ When did you first think of writing poetry? Were you inspired by a special occasion or did it come slowly and naturally?

    S. O. │ My art was born naturally from a young age. Ever since I have been writing letters, I have been writing poetry. But I did not initially recognize it as poetry nor did I make any special effort to write poetry. When I started to recognize my work as poetry the experience was similar to an imaginary butterfly emerging into my horizon and flying to a familiar scenery. At this moment, the butterfly and the scenery became a necessity to each other. It is like a jigsaw puzzle. Each individual jigsaw puzzle acquires its meaning only when it is juxtaposed to other images. In the same way each word flies directly to the suitable place in my poetry.

    M. D. │ Have you attempted to write fiction, drama, or some form of autobiography?

    S. O. │ Once I wanted to write fiction stories but I abandoned this idea because I realized I especially enjoyed expressing beauty and music within the context of poetry. I find it easier to recognize expressions of lyrical beauty in poetry in comparison to fiction narratives. I have never thought of writing dramas or an autobiography, as it is too real for me. It was very unusual for me to write about my childhood, as I did for you in 2008.

    M. D. │ Is tradition important to you? How does it affect your subject, matter and form? Are you attracted by foreign, i.e.; Western cultures and poetry (you were a student and now you are a guest lecturer of British literature)?

    S. O. │ In the face of tradition I feel humbled. Tradition is very important to me. I breathe it in and breathe it out into my poetry. When I confronted Buddhist temples, some poems were born such as: “The Rock Garden” (vol. II), “The Five-Storied Pagoda” (vol. III) and “Yakushiji Temple,” which will be published in vol. V. There was an air of mystery surrounding the presence of the temples and myself. I wanted to respond to their existence by becoming a poem. At that moment I felt the temples and I were on the same plane.

    When I think about tradition, the most important poem for me is “The Temple Bell” (vol. IV). This poem as well as “After Winter’s Passage the Bounteous Soil of Sin” (vol. IV) were published in France for the first time. In “The Temple Bell” I express that art is born from rituals and traditions consciously or unconsciously.

Regarding my style of poetry I do not follow the Japanese traditional styles of poetry such as waka and haiku. I would like to add that I am particularly interested in Western style of poetry, as I regard highly foreign cultures especially Western cultures.

The Japanese language is an ideogram, but the Western one is a phonogram. Twenty-six alphabets can be combined to express everything while the Japanese writing system requires three scripts (kanji*, hiragana and katakana). It is magic.

I specialized in English Literature because I am interested in foreign cultures and Western poetry. I have been conducting research on John Keats for some time now. As a poet, I aspire to share Keats’ sensibilities to beauty in relation to fragility and eternity.

    M. D. │ What role does the visual and musical elements of your language play in your poetry?

 S. O. │ When I look at pictures, I can distinctly hear music. When I listen to music, I can see pictures or sceneries vividly in my heart. The poem, “Sound” (vol. III), will give you a good example of how I combine music and images in my poetry. In this sense, “The Chisel” (vol. III) is also an important poem. I am living in the countryside. I often go mountain walking with my husband. When we walk through nature, I feel, I am hearing conversations between mountains, trees and birds. We human beings are in harmony with them as one of the elements of nature. When I return home, my hands move automatically to recreate what I saw and heard.

    M. D. │ What are the main difficulties in translating your poems in foreign,  culturally remote languages such as English or French?

    S. O. │ The most difficult process of translating poems is to make my poems musical in foreign languages. I always consider the length of each line. Counting meters is necessary too. In my poems, I integrate alliterations, assonances and rhymes. When I am writing poems in Japanese, I am also writing them in English in my heart. My translators listen to my Japanese readings and catch the subtle rhythm of the poems. Then they make each poem follow the original music of the Japanese poems. I especially enjoy taking part in the translation of my poems into English. Particularly when the translated poems are read aloud, I am always moved. I feel supreme bliss when I hear new beautiful sounds in translated poems. It seems to me that translating poems is much more difficult than writing poems. Therefore I am overjoyed when the poems are faithfully translated into foreign languages following scenes, sounds and rhythms.

    As for the cultural differences, it is not a serious problem for me. In my world of poetry, all human beings, animals, plants, stars, the moon, the sky and the air have personalities. They share a brotherhood. Sometimes they have quarrels, but almost everyday they co-exist in peace. These elements of nature are “beauty” to me that I cannot help but write. These elements are also very curious and it is as if they visit me asking, “Please write poems about us.”

    M. D. │ Does Buddhism (or Shintoism, or any religious, or philosophical, approach) intervene directly or indirectly in your inspiration?

S. O. │ Religion indirectly affects my inspiration. Living creatures are not so strong but they are also not so weak. Religion exists between weaknesses and strengths of human beings. We must live in cruel conflict. The poem, “Bell Tower,” which will be published in vol. V, will reveal the way I perceive life and death. Even though living creatures cannot live long, our existence is changing something in the planet. We have profoundly influenced each other in order to survive.

    I wrote a philosophical poem called, “Wings ― Things-Between” (vol. III). In this poem, I associate the word “wings” with the word “release” when soil transforms into a vase. While the soil is in the kiln, meditating under the flames, it is ready to be released.  After these two transformations, from soil to a vase and from a vase to “wings,” a vase  becomes  free from a shape and flies to the space “Between.” The wings have no destination because they are “released completely.”

    M. D. │ For you, does being a poet involve being active socially or ethically to awaken public responsibility to the ecological predicament or global civilization we are part of today? (Or “For you, does being a poet involve a prophetic function, for instance by being active ~ .”)

    S. O. │ A poet can be active socially or ethically. However, in my case I cannot answer “yes.” My poems are born spontaneously without an ethical tone. In my imaginary world all existences share our planet without imposing their morality or ego onto others. You can read about my love for living creatures in the poems of “Why Are Strawberries Red If Their Seeds Are Black?” (vol. I), “Frogs’ Paradise” (vol. II) and “Woodland Orchestra” (vol. II). Although the impression of these poems seems very far from “public responsibility” or “ecological predicament,” I was very happy when I wrote them, as I praise our potential to appreciate nature and to live in harmony with it.

Note

Mrs. Michèle Duclos is an interviewer. Yamina Laieb – Aoki and Soraya Umewaka  are collaborators.

All rights are reserved by Michèle Duclos.

À la rencontre de Shizue Ogawa

par Michèle Duclos

Michèle Duclos | Quand avez-vous commencé à écrire de la

poésie ? Y avez-vous été poussée une occasion particulière ou

est-ce venu lentement et naturellement ?

Shizue Ogawa. | Je me suis mise à écrire des poèmes dès que

j’ai appris à écrire. Seulement, je n’avais pas conscience

que c’était des poèmes. Ce qui me permet d’affirmer que mon

art naissait naturellement. Sans que je fasse d’effort spécial.

Par exemple, un papillon peut apparaître, là, soudainement,

devant mes yeux, alors qu’il n’existe pas dans la réalité. Puis

il prend son envol pour atterrir dans un paysage familier. Ce

papillon et ce paysage deviennent ainsi une nécessité l’un

pour l’autre. C’est comme dans un puzzle, chaque pièce n’acquiert

un sens que lorsqu’elle rejoint sa place à côté des autres

pièces. De la même manière, chaque mot retrouve la place qui

lui revient dans ma poésie.

M.D. | Avez-vous été tentée d’écrire des romans, du théâtre ou

votre propre biographie ?

S. O. | J’ai essayé une fois d’écrire des romans mais j’ai vite

abandonné cette idée car j’ai fini par comprendre que ma

seule satisfaction résidait dans l’expression de la beauté et de

la musicalité. Il ne me restait donc que la poésie pour le faire.

Je me suis toujours sentie plus à l’aise pour évoquer la beauté

lyrique par le biais de la poésie que par celui de la trame

romanesque.

Comme c’était trop réel pour moi, je n’ai jamais pensé écrire

des romans ni mon autobiographie. C’était vraiment exceptionnel

pour moi de vous avoir écrit au sujet de mon enfance,

comme je l’ai fait en 2008.

M.D. | Est-ce que la tradition de votre pays, pour les sujets et

pour la forme, est importante pour vous ? Êtes-vous attirée

par les cultures et les poésies occidentales – puisque vous les

avez étudiées et que maintenant vous enseignez la poésie britannique

à l’université ?S. O. | En effet, la tradition est très importante pour moi, voire

vitale. C’est grâce à elle que je deviens moi-même et que je

reste modeste. Lorsque je me suis retrouvée face aux temples

bouddhistes, quelques poèmes sont nés comme : « The Rock

Garden » (II), « La pagode de cinq étages » (III) et « Le

temple Yakushiji » qui sera publié dans le volume V.

À chaque face à face du temple et de moi-même, il se dégageait

une impression de mystère. Je voulais répondre à leur

présence en devenant moi-même un poème. C’est à ce

moment que je pouvais me sentir l’égale de ces temples.

Quand je pense à la tradition, les poèmes les plus importants

sont « La cloche du temple » (IV) et « Au sortir de l’hiver, le

sol fertile du péché » (IV). Ces deux poèmes ont été publiés

pour la première fois en France. À travers le poème « La

cloche du temple », j’affirme que l’art naît consciemment ou

inconsciemment des rituels et des traditions propres à une

communauté donnée.

Quant à mon style poétique, il est totalement indépendant du

style traditionnel japonais tel que le waka et le haïku. Je suis

plutôt influencée par le style occidental. Les cultures étrangères,

notamment occidentales, et la poésie occidentale dans

sa forme m’intéressent particulièrement. Quand j’ai découvert

pour la première fois (et cela remonte à très longtemps !)

que les langues occidentales possédaient une écriture à phonogrammes,

pour moi qui n’avais connu jusque là que

l’écriture à idéogrammes, je ne peux vous décrire quelle a été

ma surprise et mon admiration. Que vingt-six lettres combinées

entre elles puissent tout exprimer, tandis qu’en japonais

cela nécessite trois systèmes d’écriture (kanji¹, hiragana et

katakana), relèvera toujours pour moi de la magie.

En ce qui concerne mes études, je me suis spécialisée en littérature

anglaise et continue toujours à faire des recherches

sur John Keats. Je voudrais surtout insister ici sur le fait que

pendant longtemps, je ne me suis pas rendue compte que

j’étais poète. Ce n’est que quelques années auparavant que

j’ai découvert que je partageais, avec John Keats, une certaine

sensibilité à la beauté, avec toute sa fragilité et son éternité.

M.D. | Quelle est l’importance dans votre écriture des éléments

musicaux et visuels de votre propre langue ?

S.O. | Quand je regarde une image, je peux entendre distinctement

la musique et quand j’écoute de la musique, je peux

voir des images ou des scènes de façon très nette. Le poème

« Sound » (III) est un bon exemple pour percevoir ma façon

de combiner le son et l’image. De ce point de vue, « Le

ciseau » (III) en est un aussi.

Je vis à la campagne et quand je me promène dans la nature

avec mon époux, « je sens », comme c’est le cas pour certaines

personnes, que j’entends des conversations entre les

montagnes, les arbres et les oiseaux. Nous, les êtres humains,

nous sommes en harmonie avec eux en tant qu’un des éléments

de la nature. De retour chez moi, mes mains s’activent

alors pour recréer ce que j’ai vu et entendu.

Voici la vérité sur mes poèmes. Je les écris très vite. Dès que

j’entame la première ligne, ma main droite se déplace librement

jusqu’à la dernière sans une hésitation.

Je vois des images dans mon coeur. Ma main droite les suit,

servante dévouée. Aussi interrogez ma main droite sur mes

poèmes. Elle vous répondra ce qui lui arrive pendant qu’elle

écrit.

Ou bien je peux dire que mon coeur est toujours vacant. Mes

yeux regardent les feuillets nus. Comme les mots nagent

joyeusement sur le papier qui est un océan pour eux ! J’ignore

l’angoisse de l’écrivain. Je suis seulement « Une Âme qui

joue ».

Mes poèmes naissent de rien. Ils n’appartiennent à personne.

Même moi, j’ignore de qui ils sont.

C’est aussi une sorte de mésaventure pour moi. J’ignorais que

ce que j’écrivais était des poèmes. En outre je ne pensais pas

que mes poèmes valaient la peine d’être lus.

M.D. | Quelles sont les principales difficultés que vous avez

rencontrées pour traduire vos poèmes dans une langue aussi

éloignée de la vôtre que l’anglais ou le français ?

S.O. | Restituer la musicalité du poème japonais est la principale

difficulté que je rencontre lors de la traduction de mes

poèmes en anglais ou en français. Je tiens toujours compte de

la longueur des vers et veille à ce qu’elle soit identique dans

le poème traduit. Compter les mètres est tout aussi important

pour moi. Je m’applique également à y intégrer allitérations,

assonances et rimes.

Il m’arrive presque toujours d’écrire dans ma tête mes

poèmes en anglais pendant que je les écris en japonais. Avant

d’aborder la traduction, mes traducteurs m’écoutent lire mes

poèmes en japonais afin de capter la subtilité du rythme. Ce

n’est qu’après cela qu’ils sont prêts à essayer de la restituer.

J’apprécie énormément ce moment où je participe à la traduction

de mes poèmes en anglais. Notamment lorsqu’on me lit à

haute voix le poème traduit. Je suis émue. Je me sens transportée

de bonheur quand j’écoute ces beaux nouveaux sons.

J’ai toujours pensé que traduire des poèmes dans une langue

étrangère était plus difficile que les écrire dans sa langue

maternelle. C’est pour cette raison que je me sens vraiment

soulagée quand la traduction du poème a rendu assez fidèlement

les scènes, les sons et les rythmes.

Quant à la différence culturelle, j’avoue qu’elle ne m’a jamais

posé de problème particulier. Dans mon monde poétique à

moi, les êtres humains, les animaux, les plantes, les étoiles, la

lune et le ciel sont tous dotés d’une personnalité dont il faut

tenir compte.

Tout en vivant ensemble dans un esprit de fraternité, en se

querellant, bien sûr, de temps à autre, ils partagent en paix

leur univers commun. Tous ces êtres sont la beauté même

pour moi, beauté qui me désarme au point où je me surprends

en train de la décrire, je dirais, plutôt, de l’animer avec mes

mots. Ce petit monde est très curieux, il vient vers moi et me

demande : « S’il te plaît, écris des poèmes sur nous. »

M.D. | Est-ce que le bouddhisme (ou le shintoïsme ou une

autre approche religieuse ou philosophique) intervient directement

ou indirectement dans votre inspiration ?

S.O. | La religion intervient indirectement dans mon inspiration.

Les êtres vivants, sans être forts pour autant, ne sont pas

si faibles. Je conçois la religion comme un trait d’union entre

la faiblesse et la force. Nous, les êtres humains, sommes

condamnés à vivre dans un cruel conflit.

Le poème « L’abri de la cloche » qui sera publié dans le

volume V, vous révélera ma conception de la vie et de la mort.

En dépit du fait que toutes les créatures vivantes ont une

durée de vie limitée dans le temps, elles arrivent à engendrer

quelques changements, fussent-ils minimes, au niveau de

notre planète, voire de l’univers. Par ailleurs nous n’avons

jamais cessé d’agir les uns sur les autres pour le seul besoin

de survivre.

J’ai écrit un poème « philosophique » intitulé « Ailes –

entre-deux » (III). Dans ce poème, je fais un rapprochement

entre « ailes » et « être libre ». Pendant qu’elle est mise au

four, tout en méditant sous les flammes, la terre est prête pour

les grandes transformations. Après deux transformations successives

: de terre à vase et de vase à ailes, le vase, libéré ainsi

de sa forme sous la méditation s’envole vers « l’entre-deux ».

Ayant acquis la liberté totale en fin de parcours, désormais, les

ailes n’ont plus de destination en vue.

M.D. | Pour vous, le poète a-t-il un rôle social ou éthique

à jouer, une sorte de fonction prophétique, par exemple

pour éveiller la responsabilité du public aux dangers pour

l’écologie que doit affronter aujourd’hui notre civilisation

planétaire ?

S.O. | Un poète pourrait être bien entendu engagé sur le plan

social ou éthique. Néanmoins, je dois d’emblée vous répondre

que dans mon cas, il n’en est rien. Mes poèmes naissent spontanément.

Dans mon esprit, tous les êtres vivants peuplant

notre planète sont égaux. C’est de cette idée que naît en

quelque sorte ma poésie.

On voit bien mon amour des êtres vivants dans les poèmes qui

s’intitulent « Pourquoi les fraises sont-elles rouges si leurs

graines sont noires ? » (I), « Frogs’ Paradise » (II) et « Woodland

Orchestra » (II).

Bien que les préoccupations exprimées dans ces poèmes

paraissent très éloignées de toute « responsabilité civile » ou

de tout « problème écologique », il n’empêche que j’ai été très

heureuse en les écrivant et aussi j’y loue la beauté de la nature

et notre capacité à vivre en harmonie avec elle.

Notes de l’entretien

1. On dénombre environ cinquante mille caractères chinois.

2. Les poèmes dont les titres sont indiqués en anglais dans le texte

n’ont pas encore été traduits en français.

Entretien réalisé en anglais par Michèle Duclos. Le texte français a

été préparé par Soraya Umewaka et établi par Yamina Laieb-Aoki.

Tous droits réservés Michèle Duclos.

Publié en postface à

« Une Âme qui joue »

Maison Internationale de la Poésie – Arthur Haulot

en octobre deux mille dix.

Thierry-Pierre Clément, Ta seule fontaine est la mer

Thierry-Pierre Clément, Ta seule fontaine est la mer,  préface de Pierre Dhainaut, éditions . À Bouche perdue, MIPAH 150 Chaussée de Wavre, 1050 Bruxelles Belgique  2013.

Ta seule fontaine est la mer succède thématiquement à l’anthologie Fragments d’un cercle parue en 2010, qui se présentait comme l’évocation d’un long trajet, au départ tourmenté, violent, alchimiquement « noir », pour s’éclaircir plus tard dans l’esprit et par l’écriture et enfin déboucher sur un espace ouvert. Ici le périple spirituel repart, mais seulement « Au seuil de l’absence ». Nous sommes prévenus par une citation de Philippe Delaveau que « Le silence n’est pas le vide, / la nuit n’est pas l’absence ». Le poète nous demande (car nous participons à son périple) d’ « Attendre une présence » Puis, « nu/ sans atours//sans détours » après «N’avoir traversé le monde qu’à la lueur vacillante/ d’une faible bougie » « Une lumière nous atteint » et il nous est dit comme à lui : « Ouvre la fenêtre. » pour « Tenir le fil. / Tenir le fil de la vie. / Tenir le fil de la lumière. »

Certes « L’oiseau reste invisible / mais le chant dit l’oiseau // comme le chemin dit la mer// que nous ne voyons pas encore. » Or « Le chemin est une rivière/ qui se jette dans l’océan ». Dès lors nous sommes sortis de l’espace et du temps ordinaires mais sans nous couper de nos amours et de nos amitiés : « Solitude/ pleine aussi, // l’ordre des jours posé / sur le fil/ de l’éternel ». Finalement «  totalement dépouillé // abandonné libre sans limites/ absolument nu// invulnérable ».

Ce parcours, qui rejoint ce que l’on qualifie parfois de « mystique » avec tout ce que le mot peut contenir de décourageant pour un lecteur ordinaire, est en réalité un périple poétique au sens originel, « poïétique » qui se présente à nous parfois sans en prendre conscience, prisonnier que nous sommes de contingences sociales ou affectives contraignantes ; il nous arrive aussi, si nous le croisons, de le refuser. Or « Ce pays / est toujours là, / partout » contrée où, entre autres manifestations ontologiques, les contraires n’existent plus ou plutôt se complètent aussi existentiellement ; une complétude mentale et spirituelle reconnue dans les temps archaïques par les poètes penseurs de l’Occident pré platoniciens comme par des Sages de l’Orient taoïstes et bouddhistes; revendiquées aujourd’hui par l’épistémologie post quantique mais toujours récusée par la pensée dualiste arc-boutée sur un dualisme pourtant dépassé. La traversée poïétique de Clément est un retour aux sources, comme le précise dans sa belle préface Pierre Dhainaut : il s’agit d’expériences qui « ramènent vers cet état originel où rien ne s’interposait entre les choses et nous, ni le savoir ni le langage, aucune abstraction : nous faisons partie du monde, le monde nous habite. »

Il ne s’agit évidemment pas de détourner le lecteur brutalement de son existence quotidienne mais de lui faire comprendre, saisir, qu’il peut exister, à l’intérieur même de sa vie professionnelle et affective des possibilités d’ être-au-monde plus satisfaisantes, plus pleines dans leur dépouillement ; un être au monde apparemment plus simple, mais comme le définit T S Eliot en conclusion à ses Four Quartets : « A condition of complete simplicity/ (Costing no less than everything ») (Une simplicité complète/ (ne coûtant rien de moins que tout).

 Encore faut-il réussir à communiquer au lecteur cet état de grâce tranquille autrement que par un langage convenu ou abstrait qui provoquerait chez lui une réaction de scepticisme voire d’éloignement. C’est aussi la grâce accomplie par ces très courts poèmes qui ne conservent que des mots simples, concrets, souvent des substantifs liés à la nature plus spécifiquement l’eau – qui, dans leur simplicité même recréent, suscitent dans l’esprit et l’imagination créatrice du lecteur le paysage de l’âme où « nos lèvres sont les plages / et […] nous sommes la mer » comme l’écrit Farid al-Din Attar, évoqué en épigraphe ainsi que Catherine de Sienne pour qui « Il faut d’abord avoir soif ». Partageons cette soif avec le poète dont le « Regard toujours vers le vaste, / n’oublie cependant jamais le plus proche // Mésange aussi précieuse qu’épervier. »

Paru dans Poésie/première n°59 automne 2013

Bruno Durocher, Poésie à l’image de l’homme

Bruno Durocher, les livres de l’homme oeuvre complète Tome 1  Poésie à l’image de l’homme, Caractères, 2012, 1020 pages

Près de mille pages de poèmes – rarement courts – portant sur soixante années de création, depuis 1937 pour les tout premiers publiés en polonais et en Pologne première patrie de Bruno Durocher, puis, après la guerre, écrits et publiés en français et en France , jusqu’à sa mort à Paris en 1996 : il s’agit du premier de quatre volumes dont les trois prochains à venir reprendront les essais, le théâtre, et proposeront une iconographie de Bruno Durocher – une vaste entreprise des éditions Caractères qu’il avait fondées en 1950 et qui furent reprises à sa mort par sa femme Nicole Gdalia (à qui est dédié le très beau livre à l’intérieur de ce premier tome, Le Livre de la Séparation  1937-1975, véritable Cantique des cantiques).

Bruno Durocher n’est pas un pseudonyme mais la traduction littérale du patronyme du « Rimbaud polonais » Bronislaw Kaminski, que le poète rescapé de six années de camps de la mort nazis adopta simultanément à notre langue comme seconde patrie où écrire et publier la quasi totalité de son œuvre ; mais sans jamais oublier la première patrie qui l’ avait trahi, lui,  et une communauté juive qu’il avait lui-même élue, adolescent, après en avoir été écarté  prudemment  à sa naissance par sa mère juive. Sa personnalité est loin d’avoir la fermeté tout d’une pièce que ce nom induirait spontanément pour le lecteur :  jeune homme au regard plein d’espoir (…) je croyais graver mon nom sur le rocher de l’éternité / l’univers était docile comme un esclave  – car son caractère  présente une psyché douloureusement divisée,  noyé[e]  dans les contradictions de la chair» et alternant des élans de joie avec de lourdes et douloureuses périodes de doute de soi, de Dieu et du  sens de la vie. Multiple, j’interroge mes propres contradictions / je pose sur la balance ma joie et ma souffrance / et je les jette sur l’écume violente de la vie // je suis le voyageur / mon point de départ est partout / et le terminus nulle part… » /// qui suis-je donc pour être à ce point illimité et pourtant si / étroitement limité à la forme de mon corps.

            Le corps est une prison : le corps a enveloppé mon esprit/ prison qui bouche tous les orifices de l’entendement.  Son image alterne avec celle de la roue, ah ! refuser la roue qui nous tient prisonnier. Mais aussi je suis le commencement et la fin/ âme du monde mon corps remplit les ténèbres et la lumière. Le Poète inspiré par le cosmos rejette les hommes qui bâtissent des dialectiques et des logiques pour expliquer le pourquoi des choses et  ne voient pas l’étincelle enfermée au fond de l’être qui  est la négation du multiple. Il rêve d’être / sans appartenir au monde / libre et universel. Projetant peut-être son propre déchirement et ses conflits intérieurs sur le cosmos, il s’en prend à la chute ontologique, qui a entrainé pour lui le précipice du surgissement de la matière. Elle a scindé l’androgyne originel, Adam Kadmon, en mâle et femelle, qui cherchent à  se reconstituer à travers une sexualité qui mène à planter son sexe dans la jouissance de la plus belle femme. Lui-même aspire à cette unité première par delà le multiple. Il faut devenir Un avec la lumière.

            Ce Un antécédent du multiple, Durocher le recherche parfois aussi dans l’unité première platonicienne, bouddhiste, dans l’Inde éternelle, chez le Dalaï-lama, chez Magi,  chez Zarathoustra et aussi dans les mythologies païennes, qui lui offrent l’image de Prométhée enchaîné  – et voici que le vautour mange mon foie – mais il reste fidèle à son Dieu Adonai, quitte à contester  parfois non seulement son action jugée délétère mais son existence même.

Notre civilisation, cette cruelle ballade de l’histoirechevauchées sanglantes – soif de domination , Durocher ne cesse de la fustiger dans ses aspects contemporains. Mais le mal est plus ancien, originel, métaphysique, lié à la matière elle-même et présent dans la Création avec le meurtre d’Abel par Caïn. Or la situation est encore plus ambiguë car Caïn s’enracine dans la terre qu’il cultive et désire posséder il / mange le fruit de  son labeur  tandis  qu’Abel  est aussi le premier assassin il chasse le gibier / il se nourrit de la chair qui vivait qui ressentait / il versait le sang.

            Ce pascalien  qu’effraie le silence du Dieu absconditus le répudie et l’adore tour à tour. Parfois le poète connaît un répit cosmique où l’univers se concrétise dans mon corps  et l’esprit se fond en Dieu. Mais quelle relation  entre un « Dieu qui nage dans son propre absurde  – c’est alors que Dieu a conçu le sentiment de jalousie  et l’Un : en vérité rien n’existe , l’Un seul existe  et pourtant :  Adonaï – père et mère de l’univers (…) je m’offre à toi /  j’ai foi, j’ai confiance en toi. 

            C’est alors que se réalise le poète dans sa fonction prophétique. L’esthétique apparemment prosaïque de Durocher, bien différente de ses débuts surréalisants qui accumulaient images brillantes sur images obscures, est mise au service de sa foi. L’art évoque le mot artificiel (…) qui a été l’imitateur sacrilège des gestes de la sagesse primordiale // Quand le premier poète frappa le corps de la parole les cieux et la terre tremblèrent (…) Orphée-sorcier connaissait la voix des planètes / et ouvrait la porte de la lumière et de l’ombre / son héritier – jongleur grec imitait les gestes du maitre pour la réjouissance de la populace  (…) jadis le prophète était poète mais n’était pas artiste (…)  Aujourd’hui la parole n’a plus de force pour construire / elle n’est ni le corps ni l’esprit /mais elle  ressemble à une boite vide (…) créateur de la parole – créateur /que le corps devienne parole / que la parole devienne corps / et qu’elle habite parmi nous. 

               Que chaque phrase soit concrète et inébranlable / que chaque mot ait sa signification profonde et utile / il faut condamner les mots superflus utilisés pour enjoliver ou rendre étrange : être la surface et la profondeur / le noyau et le rayon / l’axe et la circonférence // Employer les mots avec précision (…) arrêter le temps / brûler les images / assécher le fleuve où coulent les phénomènes sans retour 

 Abandonnez donc les jolis mots, toute la matière qui / vous entoure, /ne dites plus moi, mais dites LUI et vous trouverez / la poésie plus claire/ que la source de la lumière. 

  S’il y avait un poète parmi nous – nous assisterions aux miracles ///

S’il y avait cent poètes parmi nous – la face du monde / serait changée – La poésie n’est pas l’art / mais une voix qui jaillit du fond de Dieu.

Dire la totalité du monde tout en suggérant le néant ultime ?

Bruno Durocher prophète-poète, poète-prophète.

Paru dans Poésie/première n°56  automne 2013

Nicole Gdalia Alphabet de l’Eclat

Nicole Gdalia  Alphabet de l’Eclat 1975-2005, éditions Caractère, 2005

En 2010, les Editions Caractères vont fêter leurs 60 ans

Nicole Gdalia a repris le flambeau de la maison depuis 1996, année de la disparition de Bruno Durocher. Elle est aussi poète.

Pour ses 30 ans de poésie, est parue une très belle anthologie « Alphabet de l’Eclat » (2005)

C’est de son activité poétique que je voudrais parler. J’aimerais apporter quelques éclairages sur les lignes de forces de ses recueils.

Nicole Gdalia est femme. Elle revendique cette spécificité, sa féminité ne cherchant pas à ressembler aux hommes, à conduire une lutte de rivalité, à écrire comme eux. Elle cherche à être, à être elle-même.

La dimension d’amour est permanente pour l’homme aimé bien sûr, mais au-delà pour tout humain. Elle pose l’amour comme une énergie conductrice et qui doit supplanter celle de l’affrontement, de la guerre, du combat si cher aux hommes guerriers. On pourrait dire qu’elle propose une autre dynamique au monde, qui apporterait l’accomplissement de l’humain dans une nature respectée. Une harmonie cosmique.

« L’amour, cette participation à l’avenir du monde exige en offrande,  une nature généreuse jusqu’à la luxuriance du gaspillage » (Racines)

Ainsi on perçoit qu’au-delà de la féminité, c’est l’humain qui est la quête et la poésie un instrument de cette quête.

Les titres de ses livres témoignent de ce cheminement.

Le premier, Racines, donne à l’arbre, auquel elle se compare, sa source, ses racines.

Ici, nous entrons, dès le premier poème, dans sa posture d’écriture : le dépouillement du visible, du sonore environnant pour une entrée en intériorité. Là commence son inspiration poétique :

« elle préférait le dépouillement ensemencement d’elle-même… »  (Les Chemins du nom )

L’intérieur, le dedans qu’elle va extérioriser par les mots. La réalité vient de l’invisible, va du dedans vers le dehors.

On pourrait penser à une connivence avec les Surréalistes, sauf qu’ici la tentative est aussi une démarche spirituelle et non pas simplement une posture psychologique.

Les racines sont donc celle d’une démarche po-étique, c’est-à-dire créatrice.

Créatrice en poésie, mais aussi créatrice de l’être, de soi.

Le second volume Les Chemins du nom illustre par son titre la démarche : « trouver le nom, aller vers le nom… » Quel nom ? Le sien propre, la connaissance de soi par la juste appellation, l’importance accordée au nom, au nom juste, « Quel est mon nom ? », écrit-elle à la fin d’un de ses poèmes. Il y a aussi de cette démarche socratique d’une maïeutique personnelle, « et je naîtrai de l’épaisseur signifiée du verbe ».

 

La Courte échelle – harmoniques, troisième de ses volumes, est le seul qui revient sur les

harmoniques de son enfance tunisienne. Mais elle y refait aussi sa généalogie familiale.

            « Ma demeure assemble les pierres de /  Jérusalem Rome et Carthage /  mes ancêtres connurent le grand exil des /  fleuves de Babylone et /   des collines sur le Tibre /Rome en fit ses esclaves comme /   Ramesses autrefois /  ma demeure assemble les pierres de /Jérusalem Rome et Carthage /  sa nostalgie est slave mais aussi orientale/ de Sefarad (…) j’ai rêvé d’autres rives et du Temple de Salomon »

Qui s’élargit très vite à un peuple, à une histoire, à la nature dont elle participe, dont elle est un élément au monde. « Je suis la mosaïque/ mosaïque d’étranges palimpsestes ».

Puis viennent Mi-dit, Monodie, courts recueils sur le langage. Le langage et son m mode d’expression : exercice solitaire et qui n’exprime jamais tout à fait le ressenti.

Chaque fois le dire cherche son interlocuteur. Soi-même ? L’autre ? Selon quelle modalité de l’expression ? Généralement l’ellipse, l’allusion, la suggestion qui laisse au lecteur l’espace de son appréhension personnelle du dit.

 

Elégie d’elle, Entre-dit, poèmes très brefs et incisifs sur la mort de l’aimé relève aussi du « à

peine dit », de « l’entre-dit » avec l’aimé disparu qui peut aussi se comprendre comme « inter-dit », ce que l’on s’interdit de dire.

Subtilité de langage mais sans gratuité aucune.

Cette ligne de force qui place l’écriture poétique dans un chemin spirituel se poursuit avec Rive majeure où le poète, après l’épreuve, semble accéder à un savoir de la vie et de la mort ;

à une maturité.

            « En flottaison / dans l’éther de la vie/ l’âme boursoufflée de ses déchirures/Elle accoste doucement à la rive majeure /de son être… »

 

Et le chant 8, avec encore une symbolique du nombre : le 8 du dépassement est celui de l’ouverture, de la jonction avec l’Infini. Mais l’œuvre ne s’achève pas, elle se poursuit dans les mots et l’amour. Car

« On ne s’ancre que dans l’amour où s’accompagnent les mondes ».

                                   *****

 

Nicole Gdalia  Alphabet de l’Eclat 1975-2005 éditions Caractère, 2005

Ce très beau volume regroupe sept recueils, depuis Racines en 1975 jusqu’au dernier qui en 2005 donne son titre au volume entier. Il est magnifiquement illustré par de plusieurs artistes contemporains tous abstraits travaillant en noir et blanc.

            Un lyrisme ardent se dégage de chacun de ces poèmes courts, parfois très courts, tels des éclats de sentiment et de pensée passionnés, où les mots récurrents « lumière » et « amour » donnent leur sens à la vie et à l’art du poète. Les racines de l’inspiration se trouvent dans une Tunisie luxuriante par ses paysages et riche de son passé culturel :

Ma demeure assemble les pierres de

            Jérusalem Rome et Carthage

mes ancêtres connurent le grand exil des

                        fleuves de Babylone et

                        des collines sur le Tibre

            Rome en fit ses esclaves comme

                        Ramesses autrefois

            ma demeure assemble les pierres de

                        Jérusalem Rome et Carthage

            sa nostalgie est slave mais aussi orientale (…)    (p.169)

                                   Enfant

                        j’ai grandi dans les

            enivrances des jasmins et

l’ombrage des palmiers gros

                        de fruits de miel

            là-bas la mer berçait Carthage

d’où jadis Didon vit trembler les empires  (p. 170)

De son enfance Nicole Gdalia garde une connivence profonde avec les paysages :

femme dans ma complicité /au règne de la terre…  (p.72)

Au silence riche de la nature / j’aime à me retrouver / féconde de moi-même//

animal de la terre  /je rejoins mes familles /roc plante oiseau /pour le voyage initiatique/

de l’unique retrouvaille (p.67)

 et de l’arbre /à / l’arbre cosmique /le chemin s’est fait  (p.77)

A travers un grand amour elle fut confrontée à l’histoire terrible du 20ème siècle : Bruno Durocher, un poète polonais, son mari, après six ans passés dans les camps de la mort allemands, adopte notre langue pour continuer à écrire, et fonde la revue puis en 1950 la maison d’édition Caractères dont elle assume seule la direction après sa disparition en 1996 :

Ils t’ont pris à la belle âge / traqué/ emprisonné dans leurs filets / les reîtres  (« Shoah 1 », p.95)

 Je suis née avec toi /née de toi /sans fard /ni maquillage /tout d’une pièce surgie /

j’ai vécu vrai /pour la première foi /sans lambeaux rapiécés /robe belle toute neuve/

couleur de flamboyant  (p.119)

Mais en 1996 c’est sa mort, la disparition, et pour elle la révolte, la lutte. Petit à petit la vie reprend ses droits ; mais c’est une vie différente, un autre moi, plus vaste, impersonnel, ouvert sur un cosmos, qui s’exprime,  présent dès le départ en filigrane :

            Je ?- me – dénude

                        jusqu’à l’amande

 

                                   émondée

 

                        je ?suis libre

                                   et

je ? accède aux battements

                        du monde   (p.420)

« Car la poésie ouvre les champs essentiels de l’invisible » dit le volume en exergue. La poésie de Nicole Gdalia ressortit à une grande Tradition hébraïque,  « en quête de// l’Aleph (p. 175). Elle écrit dans son volume «Rive Majeure » (2003) : Quatre consonnes /soutiennent le monde / après l’avoir enfanté// le secret du Nom/ connaissance / d’immortalité (p.388)

Forte de cette foi qui est aussi foi dans le langage, elle a su dès le départ que

les mots sont le pouls / quiddité de toute chose/ palpitation au feu sacré du toujours être  (p.47). Elle rejoint nos grands poètes contemporains que l’on devine en filigrane même s’ils ne sont pas nommés : Le poète est aventureux/ aventurier des routes de la terre / ses voies sont dans l’être / hauturières ou abyssales…  (p.212)

Rimbaldienne dès le départ elle s’est proposé de Recueillir les fulgurances / les modeler en mots / les surgir en paroles / échos-souvenirs/ manuscrits déchiffrés de / lointaines/ contrées terres intérieures  (p.88)

Dans le cheminement / les mots sont étincelles /le feu est au-dedans/essence de la matière  (p.425) le poète / alchimiste /brûle et décante les impuretés /donne forme /à l’invisible indicible (p.396)

Et lorsque s’assemblent et se mêlent /s’imbriquent et s’amplifient /les relents d’un monde/

à la folie /quand les hommes conjuguent/ le pervers aveuglement//

seul dans l’exil de la nuit /s’élève /jusqu’à l’infini / l’irréfragable cri du/ poète      (p.129)

 

Ce magnifique volume de 450 pages, magnifiquement illustré aussi, se clôt sur le mot   

 

                                   Amour

Nicole Gdalia,  treize battements du respir incertain, éditions Caractères, 2012

            Depuis 2005 et la parution de son magnifique Alphabet de l’Eclat 1975-2005, Nicole Gdalia  poète s’était mise en retrait devant l’éditrice des Editions Caractères qui ont fêté en 2010 leur jubilée de diamant. Celles-ci furent fondées en 1950 par son compagnon, le poète d’origine polonaise Bruno Durocher, dont Nicole Gdalia célèbre aujourd’hui la mémoire avec la sortie du premier tome des quatre volumes consacrés à son œuvre complète (Bruno Durocher, À l’image de l’homme – Tome 1 poésie – édition établie par Xavier Houssin et Nicole Gdalia).

            Heureusement la poète amie des artistes couvait derrière l’éditrice et revient avec  treize battements du respir incertain, poème bilingue français-russe (traduction de Nicolas Bokov), accompagné d’encres de Masha Schmidt, avec en couverture un fragment de la  partition originale pour piano solo de Irakly Avaliani. La poète y retrouve « les lignes de force » d’une « partition » dont «  la clef sur la portée /n’ouvre pas / toutes les notes //  ni tous // les chromatismes » mais, dans sa modestie même retrouve la grandeur de son précédent  Alphabet de l’Eclat, heureusement « sans point final ». « [Un] livre/// où les vides /// appellent l’amour ».